From competition within ports to competition between ports

 
The case of nautical services in Italy. Edited by Paolo Costa and Marco Casagrande, Venice, Marsilio, 2011. With an introduction from Paolo Costa, and essays from Francesco Acerboni, Antonia Bantourakis, Stefano Bonaldo, Elio Canestrelli, Marco Casagrande, Marco Corazza, Francesca Gravili, Raffaele Pesenti, Antonio Revedin, Dino Rizzi, Michele Zanette.

To download the introduction as a PDF file (italian language), click the link at the bottom of this page. The book can be bought at bookshops in Italy, at online stores, and at the publisher's website.

Cover of the book "From competition within ports to competition between ports"
Cover of the book "From competition within ports to competition between ports"
Locally regulating nautical services through a price-cap system rather than the
Locally regulating nautical services through a price-cap system rather than the costumary cost-plus mechanism, and improving the

Why do Italian ports grow less than their Spanish and North European counterparts?

Italy's 84/94 law garantees competition within ports, but fragmentation in the responsability concerning nautical services hinders Italian ports' competitivity.

This book explores the relation between port activities and nautical services (pilots, tugs and mooring). These services condition a port's efficiency, because their rates follow rules that illogically make them rise when demand lowers. Following EU law's principles, or just applying 84/94 law more strictly, would be enough to solve this paradox.

Starting from Venice Port's case, the authors demonstrate how, locally regulating nautical services through a price-cap system rather than the costumary cost-plus mechanism, and improving the tug fleet's use, providers would be involved in the market, and would sell their services more efficiently and at lower prices, benefiting the entire port's competitivity.